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Badminton Court

The badminton court is rectangular in shape, and has different dimensions for singles and doubles.

Standard dimensions | Badminton net | Singles Court Measurement | Badminton lines

Standard Dimensions

The full doubles court has a measurement of  13.4m (44' 0") by 6.1m (20'0"):

Badminton net

The badminton net goes across the middle and is 1.52m (5' 0") high at the middle and 1.55m (5'1") high at the posts.

The net is made of dark fine cord and is 76cm (2'6") in depth.

The line that you must stand behind when you serve is called the short service line and it is 1.98m (6' 6") from the net.

Singles court measurement

The singles court only makes use of the shaded area:

The area not shaded above is called the 'tramlines'.

In singles the long service line is the very back line of the court, parallel to the net. In doubles this is the line 76cm (2' 6") nearer the net. The area between these two lines in called the back tramlines.

The line perpendicular to the net that bisects the court is called the centre line, and the outer edges of the side tramlines are called the sidelines.

Badminton lines

Each line is part of the court, so that if the base of the shuttle touches any part of a line, it is considered as being 'in', ie having landed within the area of the court.

The lines need to be easily distinguishable, usually white or yellow in colour.

They are 4cm (1.5") wide.

Sometimes you will find two short lines either side of the long service line for doubles. These are what the shuttle should land between when being tested from the opposing back line.

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